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My Journey of Irish crochet lace began in 1999 when I was given a pattern book or Irish crochet clothing. It was my first time seeing pictures of crochet lace. I was unaware known that crochet could be defined a lace.

Through the internet, I had hoped to discover more information about Irish crochet, but was greatly disappointed. However, my desire to learn and become skilled in this art form grew. I borrowed books, joined the lace guild here in Auckland, New Zealand, and ultimately began my earnest attempt to design my own creations.

My first obstacle, and indeed the obstacle of most self-taught Irish crochet lacemakers, was the lack of explanations of the techniques used. I sought assistance from other crocheters who shared my interest and as a group, we encouraged and assistd each other in working various motifs. It was a wonderful experience. Through it, we acquired basic knowledge of thread, padding cord, understanding vintage pattern instructions, and last but not least realizing the time and effort a piece of Irish crochet lace requires.

I became more intrigued in Irish crochet, not so much for the eagerness to learn its techniques, but also a deep desire to know its history and, in particular, about the lacemakers who spent hours in the light of day and candlelight at night to earn a livelihood. Behind every piece of lace sat at woman who like us were mothers, daughters, and wives...experiencing the same milestones of womanhood and finding happiness and comfort in things that only women can appreciate.

Through my journey in the world of Irish crochet lace, I have found many friends...lifelong friends...that have encouraged and supported my enthusiasm to reach out and teach others this beautiful art. Through them I have discovered that we all have something to share in this world; a creativity that bind us to one another irregardless of race, creed or religion.