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Crochet Lace Types

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Irish Crochet

The most recognized of all crochet laces is Irish crochet and the most beautiful is that of Clones, Monaghan County of Ireland

This child's collar is my own design. The motifs are from vintage and modern books and a couple of my own designs.

The Clones knot is characteristic of the crochet lace produced in Clones

To read more about the making of this collar,       click here.

 

 

Filet Crochet

I bought this small doily from a collector who collects linens from all over New Zealand. She finds these treasures at auctions and the occasional garage sell.

This filet must be worked in at least a #100 thread. It is actually worked in 4 quarter sections. In fact you may notice a distortion of the photo on the butterfly located at the far right. That is where the doily actually ends. Even the lacet bars are not facing in the same direction!

 

Bruges Crochet

Bruges crochet, an adaptation of Bruges Bobbin Lace,  is one of my favorite crochet laces.

This piece, my own design, is worked in typical tape lace fashion where the tape is worked first and then the flowers.

 

Motifs

Motifs are most commonly used in crochet lace. They are fairly quick to make and easy to use in designs. This tiny motif was given to me by a guild member here in Auckland. I did the obvious, studied the motif and crocheted it following our modern manner!

I was surprised by the results. I chose to make it in a #60 thread (right). What a difference in size!

I can't say for certain I crocheted it the way the first individual did, but that's okay because in Irish crochet no two persons crochet a motif the same way!

 

Many beginners like to focus on motifs since they are a great way to learn Irish crochet techniques. They obviously have many uses, such as decorating as in this photo.

This is my lace census tag submitted to the 2005 lace census. The motif is from the book:

Irish Crochet Technique and Projects

by  The Priscilla Publishing Co.